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DENTAL PROCeDURES

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How to Sail Through Your New Baby’s Teething, First Dental Exam & More
June 8, 2017
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New parents know all too well that there are a million things to remember about your child’s healthcare.

Don’t get bogged down by recommendations – instead, find streamlined guides that make parenting just a little bit easier. We’re offering one to help with the dental side of infancy, toddlerhood, childhood & beyond. Your kids need your help in order to build strong, healthy teeth and positive attitudes about their dental care. Keep the milestones below in mind and you’ll be achieve smooth sailing through common tooth-related obstacles.

Have questions about your child’s dental health? Don’t puzzle through them alone – just reach out to our practice for guidance.

How to Help Your Child Build Healthy Teeth

Hinsdale Kids Dental Health - Infographic

What to Remember about Pediatric Dental Health

  • Baby teeth are more important than you might think – While it’s true that primary teeth do fall out, they guide the development of permanent teeth. It’s important that baby teeth are healthy and act as a strong blueprint. Kids with noticeable decay will also feel self-conscious at school and this can harm their self esteem. Not to mention the discomfort and emergency dental work that may be necessary to fix those cavities.
  • You lead by example – Your kids look up to you and respect your choices (even if they don’t always seem like they do). Show them that you care about brushing and flossing by cleaning your teeth alongside them each night. Put up an oral hygiene chart in the bathroom that every family member can use, and talk about the benefits of healthy teeth and avoiding overly sugary drinks or snacks.
  • Even the pickiest eaters can change – If your child refuses even the mildest of vegetables, don’t fret – slowly introducing nutritious foods will help them embrace new things. This does need to be done over a longer period of time, but it is possible.
  • Dental anxiety most often forms during childhood – Most adults with dental anxiety have had it since they were young. Children are more likely to develop a fear of the dentist because they are uncertain about what might happen during an appointment, and concerned about potential pain. Avoiding cavities by scheduling regular dental exams will help them view the dentist’s as a pain-free and even positive place.

 

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